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Sheet Music Luke Lewis

Musicians! Coleridge song settings

Attached are atmospheric song settings by composer Brian Blyth Daubney for three poems by Hartley Coleridge and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. There is a PDF score for each and mp3 files with the voice part played by a violin.

Hartley Coleridge: Until she smiled on me; Young friend, thou yet art young
Samuel Taylor Coleridge: In a moonlight wilderness

Click here to view the music scores

Click here for the mp3 file

Brian Blyth Daubney was born in 1929 in Lincolnshire. He has been editor, and later chairman, of the British Music Society. Until his retirement in 1982 he was Principal Lecturer in Music at the Simon de Montfort University in Leicester. After retirement he was an Examiner for the London College of Music until 1999. Now, fully retired, he devotes his time to writing music and poetry. Amongst his works are over 200 songs, mainly for voice and piano.

To find out more about the composer  visit his website www.brianblythdaubney.co.uk

Allston smal

Online links to Coleridge texts

Poet, philosopher, activist and radical thinker, Coleridge is unique among English poets. He was fascinated by everything from religious doctrine to chemistry, and his ideas are as relevant now as they were in his own time, and inspirational for us today. To reflect the huge range of his thought and writings we are gradually including links to his lesser-known writings. You'll find them under the Poetry and Prose tab.

bristol

Writing The West: Literature & Place. An online course

This free online course offers learners the opportunity to explore the work of four writers or groups of writers from the Romantic & Victorian era with strong links to Bristol and the South West. The course covers Bristol’s Romantic poets (Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Lovell, Robert Southey), Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, and Thomas Hardy).

To find out more and enrol visit https://www.udemy.com/writing-the-west/

william blake hires cropped

Final resting place of William Blake honoured at last

The lost and forgotten grave of William Blake is finally to be marked with a gravestone, nearly two centuries after the poet, painter and author of ‘Jerusalem’ was laid to rest – and those inspired by him have the opportunity to own their own fragment of the stone.

Blake has been acclaimed “the greatest artist Britain has ever produced” by the eminent art critic Jonathan Jones. He was voted the top painter in the BBC’s Great Britons poll. He has inspired countless cultural figures from TS Eliot and Vaughan Williams, to Bob Dylan and Bono. His phrases such as “green and pleasant land” and “dark Satanic mills” are part of the national consciousness, along with his iconic images such as The Ancient of Days.

Yet Blake died in obscurity in 1827 and was buried in an unmarked common grave in Bunhill Fields, the cemetery popular with Dissenters just outside the City of London. There is a plain memorial stone in the cemetery that simply records that the artist is buried nearby, but the exact site of Blake’s grave was lost to history until it was re-discovered by two members of the Blake Society in 2006.

Now the anonymous and seemingly unremarkable patch of lawn under which England’s pre-eminent visionary is buried is to be adorned with a stunning slab of carved Portland Stone.

As befits Blake’s profession as an engraver, the stone is to feature a quotation from his work designed and carved by Britain’s foremost stone-cutter Lida Cardozo, whose commissions have included the bronze gates of the British Library.

The ceremony of unveiling will be marked with some personal reflections from eminent and immanent Blakeans who have supported us over the years, including our President Philip Pullman, together with the performance of a specially commissioned choral work by the Australian composer Chris Williams. A little later, towards dusk, there will be a candle ceremony in which everyone present will be invited to place one of the 191 candles around the grave.

Everyone will be very warmly welcomed at the ceremony on August 12th at 3pm in Bunhill Fields cemetery, London EC1Y 1AU.

Click here to view invitation

Alfoxton

Alfoxden - back on the market!!

Well, well, well. Just eight months after it was sold at auction for £1.3 million, Alfoxden is back on the market – at £2 million.

Below is the Christie's press release announcing the sale:

'The 18th-century manor house sits within 51 acres and comprises a total of 17 guest bedrooms, the majority of which enjoy en suite facilities, plus a substantial dining room, commercial kitchens, library, sitting rooms and ancillary areas.

Well-maintained throughout the years [well-maintained??? has it been?????], the four-storey property, which is currently vacant, still boasts many of its impressive original features, including wood panelling, fireplaces and Doric-style columns.

The 51 acres of Alfoxton Park Estate offer lawns, woodland, a deer park, swimming pool and a tennis court, plus additional farm buildings and a cottage on site which could be utilised for further accommodation purposes.

A spokesman for specialist business property adviser Christie & Co said: "Lending itself to a variety of uses, the vastness of the estate and the main property offers an opportunity for a new owner to develop the site to suit their purpose, subject to planning permission.

"Permission was granted in 2011 for change of use from a hotel to a single dwelling, but equally the property is equipped to remain operational as a leisure and hospitality destination."

Having enjoyed a rich history, the estate was previously owned by the St Albyn family for many years, had housed American troops during World War II, and had been the site for Wellington House School.

The house was also home to English romantic poet William Wordsworth during his friendship with Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the estate is said to be the inspiration behind the romantic movement in England.

The main library was the setting of the first reading of the famous poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”, the longest poem Coleridge wrote which was later adapted into a feature film.

Richard Thomas, business agent at Christie & Co who is handling the sale said: “It is always exciting when such a rare and historic property is introduced to the market and with its idyllic West Somerset location, we anticipate a high level of interest from a variety of parties across the leisure sector.

"Of course, there is also potential to convert the site into a residential dwelling, and as a blank canvas there are endless opportunities for a new owner to embark on.” '

Christie & Co is marketing the freehold interest of Alfoxton Park Estate at a guide price of £2,000,000.